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Texas State Community Council
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Network of State Community Councils

It All Began with the Texas State Community Council!

The Texas State Community Council (TSCC) is is the first of a growing network of State Community Councils affiliated with POPULAR (Power Over Poverty Under Laws of America Restored), a national legal reform organization, committed to helping poor and other disadvantaged people access affordable and competent legal representation, important civil and criminal justice system reforms, as well as appropriate judicial oversight.

About Us:

TSCC is a regional human rights organization geared for community policing and criminal justice system reform through anti-corruption initiatives.  While its primary focus is criminal law matters, each TSCC division addresses a wide variety of government misconduct allegations and public integrity concerns.  The Abilene Division of TSCC serves residents of Taylor County, Texas and is also headquarters for the entire TSCC.

TSCC Officers 

MISSION:

  • TSCC is committed to good local, state, and federal government with emphasis on combating government waste, fraud, and abuse.
  • TSCC is particularly focused on human rights violations, directly or indirectly caused by government misconduct.
  • TSCC seeks to deter crime by exposing criminality among government officials and helping to ensure that average Americans are not subjected to unwarranted criminal investigation, prosecution, and/or punishment.
  • TSCC is committed to helping poor and other disadvantaged people access affordable and competent legal representation, important civil and criminal justice system reforms, as well as appropriate judicial oversight.

 

Our Operation:

Working with POPULAR, its corporate sponsor, and sister organizations, TSCC is:

  • building its membership ranks and corresponding base of volunteer support;
  • introducing its members to the anatomy of effective grassroots good government advocacy;
  • raising general public awareness about government misconduct allegations and public integrity concerns;
  • petitioning government officials and private sector organizations (such as bar associations) for specific help in addressing government misconduct allegations and public integrity concerns;
  • intervening on behalf of Sustaining TSCC Members through organization position statements and community activism;
  • coordinating and otherwise facilitating multi-faceted, case-based advocacy challenging specific instances of public and/or private sector misconduct as well as related patterns and practices; and
  • as much as possible, being a source of validation and morale support for its members.

 

Joining TSCC:

Any Texan can join the TSCC for the city, county, town, or similar political subdivision in which he or she lives.  There is no cost to become a lifetime TSCC member, though all TSCC members are encouraged to become “Sustaining Members” for an annual fee of $75.00.

Click here to download the Abilene joint membership app  

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At 11:36am on January 27, 2015, Texas State Community Council said…

On July 7, 2014, "The Law Project" issued a press release noting “(i)t is not a foregone conclusion that Texas’ legal system is impermissibly biased . . . , but Abilene, Texas attorney Cade W. Browning suggested as much to dissuade a former client of his . . . from insisting on trial of some serious personal injury claims.”

On September 8, 2014, TLP administrators received a September 4, 2014 letter from Texas “Board of Disciplinary Appeals” indicating that the alleged conduct of attorney Browning is not “a violation of the Texas Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct.”

What do you think? Tell us by completing our survey at

http://www.njcdlp.org/#!ethics-survey/c1z61

Thank you!

At 4:58pm on September 8, 2014, Texas State Community Council said…

At 2:25pm on September 8, 2014, Texas State Community Council said…

Texas Bar and Bench Scoff at Alleged Suppression of Rights

. . .

Crenshaw-Logal emphasizes a so far “undisputed contention that Browning encouraged Abilene, Texas resident George Stokes, Sr. to deny what he believes is the full scope of his compensable injuries and abandon his related legal claims . . . because of state-wide jury and judicial bias that would render them futile.”  She further notes “that the only factors Browning hinted, implied, or suggested would trigger such judicial and jury biases are Mr. Stokes’ race and/or ethnicity as a Mexican American, his socio-economic background (which is that of a high school educated person of modest financial means), and his status as a plaintiff as opposed to a corporate insured defendant.”  According to Crenshaw-Logal, “these circumstances suggest criminal violations of federal rights are an integral part of high stakes trials in Texas.”

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At 12:33pm on August 7, 2014, Texas State Community Council said…

REPORTERS NOTEBOOK: ANTHONY GRAVES CASE BECOMES ELECTION ISSUE AS TEXAS GRAPPLES WITH PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT

Although courts have confirmed that prosecutorial misconduct occurred in 91 Texas criminal cases between 2004 and 2008, not a single prosecutor among those has ever been disciplined for their misbehavior, according to new data compiled by the Innocence Proj­ect. (Allegations of prosecutor misconduct were raised in another 124 cases, but those issues were not ruled on by any court.) This is likely just the tip of the iceberg, said Emily West, IP research director, during a public dialogue on prosecutorial oversight last week at the University of Texas School of Law. Indeed, because 98% of Texas criminal cases are resolved through plea bargain, it is unlikely that we’ll ever know the true extent of the problem – which includes withholding exculpatory or other evidence possibly favorable to a defendant. Of the 91 cases in which the courts agreed there was misconduct, 36 involved “improper” arguments during trial, 35 involved improper questioning of a witness, and eight involved a failure to disclose favorable materials, known as a Brady violation. That’s exactly what Michael Morton says happened to him.

At 7:22pm on June 7, 2014, Texas State Community Council said…

A TSCC Initiative - Abilene and Lubbock Divisions:

A Lawyer’s Choice: Combat Overt Legal System Bias or Face Disciplinary Complaints

If we are to preserve America as a republic, its lawyers and all Americans have to step up their fight against rampant, serious abuse of the country's legal system: "According to Crenshaw-Logal, 'the complainants are focused on (attorney Cade W.) Browning’s insinuation that demographics, as opposed to the veracity and legal merit of a litigant’s contentions, dictate the outcome of civil trials before the District Court for the 42nd Judicial District at Taylor County, Texas, and most if not all Texas juries and judges eligible to preside over such matters.' Their anticipated disciplinary complaint indicates 'that the only factors Mr. Browning has hinted, implied, or suggested would trigger judicial and jury biases (against Mr. Stokes are his) race and/or ethnicity as a Mexican American, his socio-economic background (which is that of a high school educated person of modest financial means), and his status as a plaintiff as opposed to a corporate insured defendant'."

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