NFOJA

National Forum On Judicial Accountability

The cure for isolation when combating grave injustice is immersing oneself in whatever lawful group effort for personal relief and broader reform that one considers worthwhile. Relevant factors in assessing the merit of legal reform efforts are addressed via this NFOJA discussion -- CONCRETE ACTION: Working on the Logistics of Fundamental U.S. Legal System Reform on a Grassroots Basis.  But the key message of this post is that our strength is among similarly situated people -- those directly impacted by entrenched legal system abuse, determined to triumph over everyone and everything inclined to victimize them.  Both this and the CONCRETE ACTION discussion challenge the wisdom of viewing such "similarly situated people" as rivals for admittedly scarce, coveted assistance. 

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This video of students serenading their teacher upon her recent breast cancer diagnosis went viral and led to them all appearing on a major television network talk show just a few days ago.

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Undoubtedly psychologists, psychiatrists, humanists, spiritualists, realists, optimists, and pessimists have theories as to why family members and friends do not greet most of us with a chorus of "I'm Gonna Love You Through It" when our lives are upended by some grave miscarriage of justice.  Instead, we usually get shunned.  Some of us are even ridiculed. No matter the dynamics, the whole process of being ostracized flings many if not most people into a state of depression and self-isolation.

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. reportedly addressed the lack of validation that he and many others encountered as human rights champions by noting that "(i)n the end we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."  Implicit in his statement is that age old precept that people should undertake reasonable steps to combat, and certainly should not ignore injustice.  And imagine hope emerging as humanity embraces that obligation, shouting "Enough Is Enough!" to the world's evil-doers.  It is a beautiful thought, but a misconception of how justice begins in the wake of entrenched U.S. legal system corruption.  Real solutions begin with solidarity among those directly impacted by the problem.

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The cure for isolation when combating grave injustice is immersing oneself in whatever lawful group effort for personal relief and broader reform that one considers worthwhile. Relevant factors in assessing the merit of legal reform efforts are addressed via this NFOJA discussion --CONCRETE ACTION: Working on the Logistics of Fundamental U.S. Legal System Reform on a Grassroots Basis.  But the key message of this post is that our strength is among similarly situated people -- those directly impacted by legal system abuse, determined to triumph over everyone and everything inclined to victimize them. Both this and the CONCRETE ACTION discussion challenge the wisdom of viewing such "similarly situated people" as rivals for admittedly scarce, coveted assistance. Fortunately one picture can be worth a thousand words:    

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Motivational speaker Les Brown is credited with saying:

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If you want a thing bad enough to go out and fight for it, to work day and night for it, to give up your time, your peace, and your sleep for it . . . if all that you dream and scheme is about it, and life seems useless and worthless without it . . . if you gladly sweat for it and fret for it and plan for it and lose all your terror of the opposition for it . . . if you simply go after that thing you want with all your capacity, strength and sagacity, faith hope and confidence and stern pertinacity . . . if neither cold, poverty, famine, nor gout, sickness nor pain of body and brain can keep you away from the thing that you want . . . if dogged and grim you beseech and beset it, with the help of God, you Will get it!

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You may not be quite the crusader that Les Brown describes, but the helpful roles for grassroots legal system reformers are vast and diverse. None of us need be paralyzed by a sense of uselessness or powerlessness.  National Forum On Judicial Accountability (NFOJA) is one of four (4) banner groups under the corporate umbrella of National Judicial Conduct and Disability Law Project, Inc. a/k/a THE LAW PROJECT (TLP). Headquartered just outside Chicago, Illinois is TLP's alphabet soup of good government organizations, collectively pursuing legal and judicial reform as well as enhancement of grassroots, human rights advocacy in general.  Their strategies substantially rely on bartering, mutual support, and other creative forms of sharing.  TLP leaders endeavor to spread costs and the burdens of meaningful reform among large groups of civic minded people and, ultimately, the general public.  Average Americans are thereby empowered to devise and implement reforms that are just as shrewd, systematic, and sustained as the problems they are geared to redress.  

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*Tear*

The message on group efforts is very much on point.  Individuals may desire needed change, but to achieve it they have to unite and engage in a group effort.This has been the case historically in more instances than I can mention. 

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