NFOJA

National Forum On Judicial Accountability

Can We Look Past The Legal System Scumbags And Agree There Is No Rule Of Law Without Meaningful Citizen Oversight?

For sure, NJCDLP (National Judicial Conduct and Disability Law Project, Inc.) is pro-honesty in government, but honesty is a moral imperative that individuals may or may not embrace.  In contrast, per our U.S. Constitution, America's government is not extended the option to function based on honesty or dishonesty of individuals per se. Ours is a nation of laws, not men.  And as OAK (Organizations Associating for the Kind of Change America Really Needs) indicated to the U.N., “there is no rule of law without meaningful citizen oversight, ‘. . . a counterweight to central authority . . . and . . . as important an element in (America’s) constitutional balance as the two houses of Congress, the three branches of government and the federal system itself’.” This is the proposition around which NJCDLP endeavors to build consensus.  Should mainstream America and major media accept the distinctly American concept of “meaningful citizen oversight”, they are primed to fathom the unconscionable injustice ravaging America's Poor and a significant portion if not most of its Middle Class.     

      

As a matter of law, not to mention moral imperative, all Americans should be able to secure meaningful relief from any serious abuse of power through our country's legal system.  It matters not whether the abuse occurs or occurred in our homes, on our jobs, or in any other aspect of society.  

 

Of course there are and always will be miscarriages of justice as humans operate America's institutions, and we are imperfect.  But injustice persists at what should be an intolerable level in America, a point that OAK made to the United Nations in 2010. This unconscionable injustice continues to ravage America's Poor and a significant portion if not most of its Middle Class.  Believe it or not, that dire message can be main-streamed and otherwise packaged for major media coverage[1] should reform activists choose to pursue those ends.  

 

NJCDLP [2] attributes the human rights crisis that OAK depicted for the U.N. to certain fundamental flaws of America's anti-corruption mechanisms (keeping in mind that all serious abuses of power are forms of corruption).  NJCDLP a/k/a "The Law Project" divides the flaws between those undermining (1). America's judiciary[3] and (2). those significantly thwarting all other aspects of America's legal system[4], i.e., criminal law enforcement, child protective services, the private bar of attorneys, prosecutors, and legislative oversight. 


Naturally, conflicting views on the perfections and imperfections of our judiciary and legal system are the stuff that move America towards a "more perfect union". However, in order to mainstream OAK's message and more effectively market NJCDLP's view of the underlying problems and related solutions, we need a hearty consensus among all the major players in (or voices of) America's legal system. We need to agree that the legal system, including our judiciary, is woefully malfunctioning. NJCDLP focuses on building that consensus more than recruiting support among people who think our primary problem is legal system corruption and who promote honesty as if America's legal system would be fine (at least for the most part) were it not hijacked by dishonest lawyers and judges.  


Activists with the referenced pro-honesty orientation likely joined the grassroots legal reform movement after being devastated by some abuse of America's legal system.  Their individual and collective devastation are evidence that America's legal system does not function properly.  Yet it seems this constituency consciously or subconsciously resists any suggestion that America's legal system has problems more basic than rampant dishonesty/corruption among lawyers and judges.  


NJCDLP regularly documents the flaws of America's third branch of government more basic than rampant legal system dishonesty and corruption.  The Law Project further strives for consensus by espousing the understandable difficulties that many people have in concluding America's legal system is essentially or actually controlled by corrupt lawyers and judges.  The truth or falsity of that contention becomes a non-issue because NJCDLP shifts us towards the deficiencies of America's anti-corruption mechanisms; eliminating their avoidable flaws that unnecessarily expose Americans to the exploits of ethically challenged lawyers and judges.  


For sure, NJCDLP is pro-honesty in government, but honesty is a moral imperative that individuals may or may not embrace.  In contrast, per our U.S. Constitution, America's government is not extended the option to function based on honesty or dishonesty of individuals per se. Ours is a nation of laws, not men.  And as OAK indicated to the U.N., “there is no rule of law without meaningful citizen oversight, ‘. . . a counterweight to central authority . . . and . . . as important an element in (America’s) constitutional balance as the two houses of Congress, the three branches of government and the federal system itself’.” This is the proposition around which NJCDLP endeavors to build consensus.  Should mainstream America and major media accept the distinctly American concept of “meaningful citizen oversight”, they are primed to fathom the unconscionable injustice ravaging America's Poor and a significant portion if not most of its Middle Class.                  



[1] From time to time a miscarriage of justice captures America's attention and provokes enough public outcry to precipitate meaningful change.  Of course major media coverage tends to be part of that process, but some injustices are subject to major media black-outs.  Controversies that can't be summed up in a 7 second sound-bite or that are more likely to provoke retaliation than a Pulitzer are unlikely to make major media news.

[2] NJCDLP is a national nonprofit legal reform organization and the corporate umbrella for multiple grassroots good government initiatives including OAK and National Forum On Judicial Accountability (NFOJA).  Learn more at www.njcdlp.org

[3] NFOJA spearheads most of NJCDLP’s judicial accountability/reform initiatives.  Learn more at http://50states.ning.com

[4] POPULAR (Power Over Poverty Under Laws of America Restored) spearheads most of NJCDLP’s legal reform initiatives that are not primarily related to America’s judiciary.  Learn more at www.popular4people.org

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Good Evening,
I read the article and completely agree, my only question is should we interject and sense of officials having to be accountable?
Thankyou,
Dawn

The bad people who caused us harm are the immediate problem for those of us subjected to legal system abuse. When one government system after another fails to provide us reasonable relief from that harm -- not even a clearly fair and impartial consideration of our related claims -- the bigger problem is the inadequacy of those systems.

We need not make a choice between holding individuals versus our failed systems accountable. Both should be held accountable.  But when we keep trying to extract accountability from systems inclined to deny us relief (for whatever reason) without examining why that protection mechanism fails and seeking related solutions, futility is sown into our quests for vindication.

One may say that the systems fail because they are operated by dishonest or corrupt people.  Still, the bigger problem is that our government is not adequately protecting us from the dishonesty and corruption of these people.  That lack of protection is at the level of a constitutional crisis in America, a fact that OAK shared with the U.N. in 2010.  It is a point that bears repeating.      

         

This is exactly what happens in North Dakota, Make a complaint or accusation and the legal system circles the wagons and then tries to crush you. 

Meaningful citizen oversight provides a workable solution in obtaining impartial judicial discipline.  It has origins in the common law as with grand juries and trial juries helping attain impartiality and acting as a check on government and is also rooted in the 9th and 10th Amendment as well.

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